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Havana Nocturne
T. J. English

To underworld kingpins Meyer Lansky and Charles "Lucky" Luciano, Cuba was the greatest hope for the future of American organized crime in the post-Prohibition years. In the 1950s, the Mob—with the corrupt, repressive government of brutal Cuban dictator Fulgencio Batista in its pocket—owned Havana's biggest luxury hotels and casinos, launching an unprecedented tourism boom complete with the most lavish entertainment, top-drawer celebrities, gorgeous women, and gambling galore.

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Until Death Do Us Part
Ingrid Betancourt

Ingrid Betancourt, a senator and a presidential candidate in Colombia, grew up among diplomats, literati, and artists who congregated at her parents' elegant home in Paris, France. Her father served as Colombia's ambassador to UNESCO and her mother, a political activist, continued her work on behalf of the country's countless children whose lives were being destroyed by extreme poverty and institutional neglect. Intellectually, Ingrid was influenced by Pablo Neruda and other Latin American

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Milagros: A Book of Miracles
Helen Thompson
Let the ancient power of milagros work miracles for you! Based on traditional Latin American talismans, these tiny silver charms are reminders that a miracle can fit in the palm of your hand. Throughout Latin America and the American Southwest, milagros are offered at shrines and sacred sites by believers as requests for divine assistance, or as thanks for blessings received. Modern day milagros may be carried in a pocket to protect from illness or harm, kept in the office
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Beyond Imported Magic: Essays on Science, Technology, and Society in Latin America
Eden Medina, Ivan da Costa Marques, Christina Holmes, Marcos Cueto
The essays in this volume study the creation, adaptation, and use of science and technology in Latin America. They challenge the view that scientific ideas and technology travel unchanged from the global North to the global South -- the view of technology as "imported magic." They describe not only alternate pathways for innovation, invention, and discovery but also how ideas and technologies circulate in Latin American contexts and transnationally. The contributors' explorations
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