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The True Believer: Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements
Eric Hoffer
A stevedore on the San Francisco docks in the 1940s, Eric Hoffer wrote philosophical treatises in his spare time while living in the railroad yards. The True Believer -- the first and most famous of his books -- was made into a bestseller when President Eisenhower cited it during one of the earliest television press conferences.Completely relevant and essential for understanding the world today, The True Believer is a visionary, highly provocative look into the mind of the fanatic
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The Future of Peace: On The Front Lines with the World's Great Peacemakers
Scott Hunt

In this illuminating journey around the globe, Scott A. Hunt takes us face to face with true heroes including: the Dalai Lama; the famed dissident of Burma, Aung San Suu Kyi; and the activist who brought peace to Latin America, Oscar Arias of Costa Rica, who share their historic struggles and show us how to find optimism in the face of anguish, and compassion in the place of animosity.

What does it mean to fight for peace? From the riotous streets in Burma to a prison cell in

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Beyond Red and Blue: How Twelve Political Philosophies Shape American Debates
Peter S. Wenz
On any given night cable TV news will tell us how polarized American politics is: Republicans are from Mars, Democrats are from Canada. But in fact, writes Peter Wenz in Beyond Red and Blue, Americans do not divide neatly into two ideological camps of red/blue, Republican/Democrat, right/left. In real life, as Wenz shows, different ideologies can converge on certain issues; people from the right and left can support the same policy for different reasons. Thus, for example,
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Semblance and Event: Activist Philosophy and the Occurrent Arts
Brian Massumi
Events are always passing; to experience an event is to experience the passing. But how do we perceive an experience that encompasses the just-was and the is-about-to-be as much as what is actually present? In Semblance and Event, Brian Massumi, drawing on the work of William James, Alfred North Whitehead, Gilles Deleuze, and others, develops the concept of "semblance" as a way to approach this question. It is, he argues, a question of abstraction, not as the opposite of
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Plato's Revenge: Politics in the Age of Ecology
Patrick Ophuls
In this provocative call for a new ecological politics, William Ophuls starts from a radical premise: "sustainability" is impossible. We are on an industrial Titanic, fueled by rapidly depleting stocks of fossil hydrocarbons. Making the deck chairs from recyclable materials and feeding the boilers with biofuels is futile. In the end, the ship is doomed by the laws of thermodynamics and by the implacable biological and geological limits that are already beginning to pinch.
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Take Back the Center: Progressive Taxation for a New Progressive Agenda
Peter S. Wenz
Midcentury America was governed from the center, a bipartisan consensus of politicians and public opinion that supported government spending on education, the construction of a vast network of interstate highways, healthcare for senior citizens, and environmental protection. These projects were paid for by a steeply progressive tax code, with a top tax rate at one point during the Republican Eisenhower administration of 91 percent. Today, a similar agenda of government action (and
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DIY Citizenship: Critical Making and Social Media
Matt Ratto, Megan Boler, Ronald Deibert
Today, DIY -- do-it-yourself -- describes more than self-taught carpentry. Social media enables DIY citizens to organize and protest in new ways (as in Egypt's "Twitter revolution" of 2011) and to repurpose corporate content (or create new user-generated content) in order to offer political counternarratives. This book examines the usefulness and limits of DIY citizenship, exploring the diverse forms of political participation and "critical making" that have emerged in
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Scent of Lemons
Lynch, Jonah
"e;Touch, scent, taste. Three of the five senses that cannot be transmitted through technology. Three-fifths of reality, sixty percent. This book is an invitation to notice that other sixty percent"e;.In The Scent of Lemons Jonah Lynch considers if technology is stealing something essential from us in return for all it's marvellous gifts. He writes: "e;I feel the urgent need to clarify my relationship with the technologies which in ever more elegant and hidden ways accompany our
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The Nonsense of Free Will: Facing up to a false belief
Oerton, Richard
Did Myra Hindley deserve to be punished? Does any criminal? Is belief in free will an essential foundation for morality, or an excuse for unwarranted cruelty? Is free will a myth and, if so, can we let go of it?<br /><br />
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Relativism and the Foundations of Liberalism
Long, Graham
Moral relativism is often regarded as both fatally flawed and incompatible with liberalism. This book aims to show why such criticism is misconceived. First, it argues that relativism provides a plausible account of moral justification. Drawing on the contemporary relativist and universalist analyses of thinkers such as Harman, Nagel and Habermas, it develops an alternative account of 'coherence relativism'. Turning to liberalism, the book argues that moral relativism is not only consistent with
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